Long John Silver Trust




Each day we offer you at least one different Fact of the Day, which is usually Pirate orientated:
Fact of the Day:-

The term buccaneer derives from the Arawak word buccan, a wooden frame for smoking meat, hence the French word boucane and the name boucanier for French hunters who used such frames to smoke meat from feral cattle and pigs on Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic). English colonists anglicised the word boucanier to buccaneer.


Fact of the Day:- Buccaneers were pirates who attacked Spanish and French shipping in the Caribbean Sea during the late 17th century. The term buccaneer is now used generally as a synonym for pirate. Originally, buccaneer crews were larger, more apt to attack coastal cities, and more localized to the Caribbean than later pirate crews who sailed to the Indian Ocean on the Pirate Round in the late 17th century.
Fact of the Day:-

On Robert Louis Stevenson's tomb in Samoa is engraved his requiem:

Under the wide and starry sky,
Dig the grave and let me lie.
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.
This be the verse you grave for me:
Here he lies where he longed to be;
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill. - - -

Stevenson was loved by the Samoans and the engraving on his tombstone was translated to a Samoan song of grief which is well known and still sung in Samoa.



On This Date In History
26th March in 1722:- Charles Eden, Governor of North Carolina, died. He is best known for his actions to end piracy in the area. Gentlemen pirate Stede Bonnet and the notorious Blackbeard (Edward Teach) surrendered to Governor Eden and received the King's Pardon upon promising to change their ways.